pictures

Transfer pictures from a Motorola W376g (KRAZR) to a PC

Question: I recently purchased a Motorola W376g camera phone from Tracfone, and I'd like to get pictures I took on it over to my computer. Is this possible?

Answer: The Motorola W376g from Tracfone is basically the Motorola KRAZR phone with the same built-in 1.3 megapixel camera. The KRAZR is a Bluetooth-enabled phone that has a USB port for file transfers between the phone and a PC using software like Motorola's PhoneTools or DataPilot.

However, these features are disabled on the Tracfone W376g for data transfer. The USB port is only used for charging the phone and Bluetooth is only enabled for connecting with hands-free devices.

Tracfone offers this phone at only $29.95 with no activation fees, and you purchase minutes for airtime (ie. you prepay for only the minutes you want/need). They've disabled the data transfer features and force you to use airtime instead.

You can still transfer pictures from your Motorola W376g phone to your computer by sending them as an email.

Sending photos from a Motorola W376g to a PC using email:

To do this, open the picture by clicking the main center/menu button on the phone and then selecting Multimedia -- Pictures -- Additional Storage Device. Scroll to find the picture and select Menu -- Send in Message.

You can enter an email address to send it to your computer, and it'll show up as a file attachment in your email inbox. You can also enter a phone number and send it to any other mobile device that supports picture messaging, including other Tracfone W376g phones.

How to Transfer Pictures to a Digital Picture Frame

Question: I was wondering how I would transfer music from my computer onto the memory stick and then transfer them onto my digital picture frame. Also, is it possible to have music on my picture frame when I show my pictures?

Answer: Digital picture frames are awesome. I have one at work, my wife has one at home, and we gave my parents one for Christmas this year.

Transferring pictures from your computer to a picture frame is a matter of copying the pics to a memory card or usb flash drive, and then plugging the memory card into your picture frame.

Here's a step-by-step guide for loading pictures onto a digital picture frame:

Step 1: Find the pictures on your hard drive

If you're using Windows Vista, then your pictures will most likely be located in the Pictures folder under your User folder (C:\Users\YourName\Pictures).

Expand the Pictures folder and find the photos that you'd like to view on the picture frame. If possible, copy them all to a single folder location, as that will make the next step much easier.

Step 2: Copy the pictures to an SD Micro memory card, or to a USB Flash Drive

Find the SD Micro memory card slot on the side of your laptop, or in the front of your desktop, and insert the card. Memory cards are dirt cheap these days, and you can get a 2GB card for under $10 on Amazon

5 Tips for taking great photos with a camera phone

Cell phone camera technology is changing rapidly, and manufacturers are starting to bundle higher resolution cameras with their cell phones.

Sanyo’s M1 and Apple’s iPhone both include 2.0-megapixel cameras that take decent quality photos, and Blackberry phones include a built-in flash with their 2.0-megapixel cameras.

More recently the Samsung Flipshot hit the market with a high quality 3.0-megapixel camera; putting it head and shoulders above typical camera phones like the Motorola RAZR V3 with it’s low-end 1.3-megapixel camera.

In fact, most cell phones still come with low resolution 1.3 megapixel VGA cameras that take low quality pictures; just enough to capture the moment, but nothing you’d want to show off in a photography contest.

You can still pull off a little magic though with your existing camera phone, provided you follow a few simple guidelines:

1. Samsung Flipshot U900Stillshots are better than motion shots

If you can get your subject to hold still, the picture will turn out sharper and more recognizable. Action shots - especially with the slight delay inherent to digital cameras - will turn out very blurry or bitmapped on a camera phone (that choppy look you get from a low-res camera).

2. Lighting is everything

Take your photos outside with plenty of light. Most camera phones don’t come with a flash, which means they’ll use a longer shutter time indoors to capture more light - resulting in an overall blurry picture, since subjects will be moving while the shutter remains open.

Avoid too much bright sun however, since it can create unattractive deep facial shadows if your shot is taken into the sun. A good rule of thumb is to always keep the sun behind you, which will illuminate your subject and get rid of ugly shadows.

3. Close-ups are better than long shots

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